CeltoGraphics

Graphic Arts and Celtic DNA


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A Road Taken-DP challenge

Sometimes a long interval of weeks, even months, goes by without me visiting the nearby beach along our northern California coastline.  Manchester State Park Beach is a several miles long sandy beach, often spotted with new driftwood cast ashore by recent storms.  Visitors to the beach, especially those with kids, delight in building shelters, or ‘forts’ from scavenged limbs and broken boat timbers.  One of my occasional pastimes is to do a quick sketch and painting of the more interesting ones.

On one of my early morning spontaneous hikes across the sand dunes to the ocean, a spongy, sandy trek that gets my heart thumping,  I arrived at a near empty beach that had been scoured by strong tidal waves.  Hardly any driftwood in sight, except maybe that one small dark clump up near the northern end, where the Garcia River empties into the ocean.  I started walking that way and every time I looked back from the rolling surf to the beach the clump seemed to have moved a little.  As I got closer I could see this little guy inching toward the surf as I approached:

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Seal pup on Manchester Beach 

This pup may have lost his mother to an orca pod, or some other calamity at sea in our era of uncertain ocean conditions.  He looked like he was ready to go back into the surf to search again for her, and I could only wish him well, and stay safe.

Perhaps we both had an opportunity to reflect on–who is this guy watching me? and the challenges of different sorts facing each of us.  A fanciful conclusion to a road taken for this morning.

fort1

Manchester Beach Shelter—Rm w/Vu, a/c, Olympic-size pool

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Afloat

Snowy Plovers in flight over ocean - These small birds are an endangered species along our northern California coast.  They nest and lay eggs on beach sand, which makes them vulnerable to unaware visitors with unleashed dogs, and of course, other predators.  Sad. If only folks were aware.

Snowy Plovers in flight over ocean – These small birds are an endangered species along our northern California coast. They nest and lay eggs on beach sand, which makes them vulnerable to unaware visitors with unleashed dogs, and of course, other predators. Sad. If only folks were aware.

July 4 Fireworks at Point Arena Cove--The grand finale burst!  There is a great crescendo of OOHHHs and AAHHHs from the crowds on the rocky beach, and everyone's spirit soars aloft

July 4 Fireworks at Point Arena Cove–The grand finale burst! There is a great crescendo of OOHHHs and AAHHHs from the crowds on the rocky beach, and everyone’s spirit soars aloft

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “Afloat.”

These are a couple of shots in my collection that suggest a feeling of “Afloat” to me.


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WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: DEPTH

Tide Pool creatures live in a world defined by a changing depth of perhaps fifteen or twenty feet, and may have only the dimmest sort of consciousness–that the mother tide shall return with a sustenance and embryonic fluid needed for protection and propagation.  We humans live with what is thought to be the highest sense of consciousness, and in a somewhat deeper layer of sustaining gases and nutrients–perhaps reaching to twenty thousand feet.  How infinitesimally small both layers are when thinking of a universe that continues to expand in depths measured in billions of light years.

Tidepool Urchins--waiting for tide to come in.

Uncovered Sea Anemones in rock pockets–waiting for the tide to hurry back.


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In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Express Yourself.”

Here’s your blog artist at a recent July 4 parade, attempting to express himself in watercolor painting: see first photo.  It was difficult to find the proper focus when there was such distraction from our coast highway artists collective models, posing at the front of the truck bed: see second photo.

ParadeArtistPA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA


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Weekly Photo Challenge: Convergence

The aspect of the convergence theme that we’d like to dwell on is the journey of earth’s water, falling from the moisture laden atmosphere, onto the connecting creeks, streams, and rivers coursing over the planet’s land masses, and converging once again into the primal source of all water: the vast and boundless oceans.  There, with an assist of energy from the sun, the mists of water vapor will rise again into the atmosphere to renew the ceaseless cycle.

We were reminded of this as the local community watched the rising pool of water within the dammed estuary of the Gualala River, prevented from flowing directly into the ocean by the annual sand bar that builds up during low flows in the dry spring and summer months, from silt and sands deposited out of the slow moving river.  Then, after the rains return in late fall, the pool level rises again, until, with a thunderous roar, it bursts through the sand bar and reenters the source of its being.

The breakthrough occurred last Sunday during a rain storm.  We took these photographs yesterday and you can notice the strong currents still sweeping through the gap in the sandbar.  Occasionally, huge trees will be swept down the river and through the gap.  Large schools of steelhead trout have been waiting offshore for the breakthrough, and will now migrate up the Gualala River to their ancient spawning grounds.  The endless cycles of life continue.

Gualala River in foreground, sandbar breach and ocean beyond

Gualala River in foreground, sandbar breach and ocean beyond

Sandbar breach in foreground, ocean beyond.

Sandbar breach in foreground, ocean beyond.